Stainless Steel Strip For small quantities of stainless spring steel strip, contact BSS Steel Strip, the small quantity specialists
  
 
 
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There is hardly a material thinkable that has found its way to so many applications in such a short period of time as stainless steel. Only developed in the first decade of the 20th century stainless steels are irreplaceable in the world today. Although kitchen sinks, refrigerators and other consumer goods are probably the most visible applications it is the industrial application where stainless steel has its biggest impact on our daily lives. Some chemicals couldn't be produced without the use of corrosion resistant vessels and piping systems. Oil & gas production would often be close to impossible or very costly without the successful application of stainless steel.

Article from Keys to Metal
Stainless steels represent the most diverse and complex family of all steels. The single most important property of stainless steels, and the reason for their existence and widespread use, is their corrosion resistance. Stainless steels are stainless because a protective layer spontaneously forms on their surfaces and reduces the rate of corrosion to almost negligible levels. Under normal conditions, this layer heals very rapidly if scratched, so that if stainless steels only suffered from uniform corrosion, they could survive for literally millions of years.

Passivity

As mentioned above, the reason for the good corrosion resistance of stainless steels is that they form a very thin, invisible surface film in oxidizing environments. This film is an oxide that protects the steel from attack in an aggressive environment. As chromium is added to steel, a rapid reduction in corrosion rate is observed to around 10% because of the formation of this protective layer or passive film. In order to obtain a compact and continuous passive film, a chromium content of about 17% is needed. This is the reason why many stainless steels contain 17-18% chromium.

 

 

Stainless steels are stainless because a protective layer spontaneously forms on their surfaces and reduces the rate of corrosion to almost negligible levels. Under normal conditions, this layer heals very rapidly if scratched, so that if stainless steels only suffered from uniform corrosion, they could survive for literally millions of years.

This thin, invisible surface layer is an oxide that protects the steel from attack in an aggressive environment. As chromium is added to steel, a rapid reduction in corrosion rate is observed to around 10% because of the formation of this protective layer or passive film.

 

In metallurgy, stainless steel is defined1 as a ferrous alloy with a minimum of 10.5% chromium content. Such steels have higher resistance to oxidation (rust) and corrosion in several environments


BSS Steelstrip, specialise in small quantities of spring steel strip including type 301 hard rolled for feeler gauges, springs and applications where high tensile strengths are required, please visit our website for more information.

Common stainless steel grades, properties and analyses can be found here

SUPPLIERS OF STAINLESS STEEL STRIP

Company Location Telephone no. Fax Web

Brown Metals USA 1 909 484-3124 909- 484-1085

CADA Stainless & Alloys USA 1-(877) 223-2685 (845) 469-6955

Avocet UK 01625) 590745
 
01625) 590772
 

British Stainless Steel Association UK    

B S Stainless Ltd UK (01254) 681112
 
01254) 681113
 

Knight Strip Metals UK +44(0)1707 650251 +44(0)1707 651238

Allied Stainless

 

UK 01384 635 000
 
01384 633 000

Precision Steel Warehouse, Inc. USA 1-800-323-0740 1-847-455-1341
 

Stainless Steel Services Ltd UK 0121 523 8100  

Staystrip UK 44 0121 455 0111 121 454 5524

Vetchberry Steels  UK 44 121 322 2345 121 327 0288

Sandvick Sweden

Lamineries Matthey SA Switzerland +41-32-751 35 35  

Thyssen-Krupp Germany

Hisar Metal Industries India    

Quality Foils India 91-01662-220327 91-01662-220330

Steel Specifications
 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Stainless steels are classified by their crystalline structure:

Austenitic stainless steels comprise over 70% of total stainless steel production. They contain a maximum of 0.15% carbon, a minimum of 16% chromium and sufficient nickel and/or manganese to retain an austenitic structure at all temperatures from the cryogenic region to the melting point of the alloy. A typical composition is 18% chromium and 8% nickel, commonly known as 18/8 stainless.

Ferritic stainless steels are highly corrosion resistant, but far less durable than austenitic grades and cannot be hardened by heat treatment. They contain between 10.5% and 27% chromium and very little nickel, if any. Most recipes include molybdenum; some, aluminium or titanium. Common ferritic grades include 18Cr-2Mo, 26Cr-1Mo, 29Cr-4Mo, and 29Cr-4Mo-2Ni.

Martensitic stainless steels are not as corrosion resistant as the other two classes, but are extremely strong and tough as well as highly machineable, and can be hardened by heat treatment. They contain 11.5 to 18% chromium and significant amounts of carbon. Some grades include additional alloying elements in small quantities.